Bloody Metablogging

Alright, Lurkers, my apologies for going off the grid for quite a while. Moving from one country to another is one hell of a crazy phase–which for some reason I still keep on doing despite the consequences–plus the fact that my nth wind in writing has not completely breezed its way [back] to me yet. But here I am, all psyched to get my special problem (school) over and done with, and by all means, get back to blogging–travel or no travel.

Some two months ago (seriously, it has been two months already??), I joined a colleague, and UNICEF consultant-cum-fellow travel blogger, Andy Brown, in his quest to try laab ped or minced duck salad–a Lao specialty. I have been devouring laab from Day one in Vientiane back in 2009 and loving it since. It is prepared, basically, with minced meat (pork, chicken, beef, duck, fish, etc) tossed with some toasted black rice, heaps of red chili (optional) and mint leaves to top it off. Laab is perfect with tammakhoung (papaya salad), sticky rice and Beer Lao (you’re welcome!).

Laab Ped is pretty awesome

Laab Ped is pretty awesome

Andy wanted to try laab, rather desperately (Okay, not really!). But while I understood the enthusiasm, I could not help but wonder, “What’s with the excitement? It’s just salad. Also, they have it in Thailand!”

When they said try laab ped AND blood, I immediately thought the coagulated street-food type that I avoid at all costs (betamax in Pinoy). So you can just imagine my cringe-worthy moment when I saw this:

THIS.

That’s laab ped for you–drenched in duck’s blood.

Okay, now I shouldn’t be a hypocrite because Pinoys also serve a dish called dinuguan. But at least that one is cooked. Not fresh, and bloody red (so redundant but it can only be described as such), and…salty!

See that? It's like crime scene!

See that? It’s like a crime scene!

But I was there for a reason, and that reason is Cole Walks. And to blog about Andy blogging. So I dug in.

You see, it actually tastes pretty much the same as the regular laab. If you were to be blindfolded before trying this dish, I do not think the taste is that strong. Unless you are on Master Chef or something. Anyway, there was also Beer Lao involved, which is a life-saver in every food trip I have to say, I guess it was all good.

We also got to interview Andy about everything “British”; he even explained the correct usage of the expression ‘bloody’, which by the way, is NOT the context of this post’s title.

(L) All smiles UNTIL (M) Oh noooo! (R) He's taking notes. NOTES.

(L) All smiles UNTIL (M) Oh noooo! (R) He’s taking notes. NOTES.

When in Laos, excluding vegetarians and animal rights activists, try laab ped with blood. It’s an experience. Although, personally, it is way too extreme for me. But who am I to judge, Andy hates balut!

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Filed under Food and Dining, When In Laos

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